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ARTICLE 22

« We design jewellery to transform stories of negative into positive and make impact. »
- Article 22

Klow has selected Article 22’s accessories because they are made from recycled military grade. Article 22 is offering a new purpose to this war item : one of these beautiful stories we love to share.


"Bomb to Bracelet. The transformation of negative into positive" 

 

This New-York based brand has been created in 2014. They aim to re-purpose a material with a negative connotation into a beautiful object. Article22 transforms military grade aluminium, allowing Laos to be cleared from bombs and the craftsmen to grow their community and gain a better lifestyle.
At Klow, we think as well that we can combine all of that, and this is the kind of fashion industry we want to promote. A safer, cleaner, greener and creative one.  

CONSCIOUS FASHION

Elizabeth Suda, travelling in Laos, discovered a small community transforming bomb into spoon. At that time, she had the idea of the peacebomb bracelet and how to promote & help the Laotian community. She wanted to answer to a societal issue “how and by whom are the goods we consume made?” in offering an alternative with Article22. 

Unless she studied History at Williams College and Oxford University, she was not aware that the Secret War in Laos between 1963 and 1974 left the country with more than 80 million unexploded bombs in their lands.
Since then, Article22 have been highlighting the situation through all their commitments and the products have been sold in more than 40 countries.  

SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS

To minimize environnemental impact, all their garments are made of up-cycled materials
Article 22 decided to turn a waisted material into a new purpose: jewelries.

Klow approves this approach of sustainability and is a supporter of the up-cycling.  

Military grade aluminium

The metal includes Vietnam War era bombs, plane parts, military hardware and other aluminium scrap.
The aluminium is shrapnel, melted and recast in woods and ash molds.
The artisans are using this method to make spoon since. generations. It is a tradition kept and reuse to make the jewelries.

Leather cordon


Cow leather with organic dying 

Cotton pouch

Handwoven by a cooperative of women weaver in Vientiane, Laos.

CERTIFICATION & PARTNERS

THE BRAND IS PART OF THE FAIR TRADE FOuNDATION. Fairtrade are working for farmers’ rights in developing countries. They help them get organized and make sure they are guaranteed a minimum price for their crop. On top of that Fairtrade premiums are given to villages for investments in schools, infrastructure and other social improvements.


IN ADDITION, ARTICLE22 donates profits from each purchase to both a village development fund and to MAG (Mines Advisory Group) to help clear local Laotian land of unexploded bombs, making farmland and communities more safe.

 THEY ALSO CLOSELY WORK WITH LEGACIES OF WAR. THEY RAISE AWARENESS ON THE LIVING CONDITIONS OF THE LAOTIAN CAUSED BY THE WAR AND THE IMPACT ON THE COUNTRY. IN THAT DIRECTION, THEY RAISE FUNDS TO IMPROVE THEIR LIFESTYLE AND CHANGE THE SITUATION.  

ARTICLE22

ONLY CLICK ON THE LOGOS TO FIND OUT MORE 

*AT KLOW WE MAKE SURE TO SIMPLIFY YOUR RESEARCH AND GIVE YOU ACCESS TO THE PRODUCT THAT PERFECTLY MATCH YOUR PERSONAL VALUES, 
OUR TEAM TAG EACH PRODUCTS FROM EACH BRAND WITH THE RIGHT LEGEND & LABELS. 
PLEASE MAKE SURE TO READ THE DESCRIPTION ON OUR PRODUCT PAGES FOR MORE DETAILS ABOUT EACH CLOTHES & ACCESSORIES.

FAIR WORKING FOR THE FARMERS

In Naphia Village where the base of all of the aluminum components of the jewelry is made, they pay artisans 7x the local price of a spoon (the first thing they started making from the war material in the 1970s).
For part time work, they earn on average, 5x the local minimum hourly wage.

Importantly, they build supply chains that are, when possible, home-based and support the local way of life and culture—rather than tearing them away from their community to work in a factory.
They work in the open air under thatched roofs from their gardens in order to tend to the other aspects of their lives as parents and subsistence farmers.

 The jewelry provides income and optionality; they have seen living conditions improve with income for transportation, communication, education, and health care. 

TRANSPARENCY


“The future is not fated and that it takes consciousness and dedication to build the world we want."

Article 22 jewelries are made In Laos and sometimes assembled in Vietnam or New-York, we decided to select the brand regarding its story, values for humanity and sustainability.
 
In our point of view, we can change things in the fashion industry by leading the change step by step.
Having brands with high values in those countries create an immense impact for those people abroad who are living in less developed countries than in Europe. 
Often, human rights in those countries are scorned and we don't think it's right. In Klow point of view, all human are equal and all of them should have the right to work in decent conditions.  If all sustainable brands decided to produce in western countries it will only lead to a worth wealth distribution. It will not encourage those factories abroad to be "better" in term of sustainable practices and it would only confine those workers with people with less ethical business values.
 1/6 people in the planet work in the textile industry, fashion is a major actor of local economy in numerous countries.
For Klow, it is important to support and contribute to a healthier work environment for all of the human in the world. No matter where they are from.  



What is the impacts of my jewelries? 

Cleared lands

Roadside village in Xieng Khuang, one of the most heavily bombed provinces. Laos is the most heavily bombed country per capita in history.
Between 1964 and 1973, the US dropped 2 million tons of ordnance on Lao PDR, averaging one B-52 bomb load every 8 minutes, 24/7, for 9 years. At the current rate of removal, it will take an estimated 800 years to clear all unexploded ordnance.
Each bracelet purchased clears from 3m2 of bomb littered land. ARTICLE 22 donated to clear 10,000m2 in 2011 and 20,000m2 in 2012.

Tourism & Economy

Today, villagers continue to take a constructive approach to the destruction of war by recovering their livelihoods through available local resources, creating molds from wood and ash, kilns from the earth, spoons and now bracelets from aluminum war scrap metal.
Over the years, article22 work has contributed to making the village one of the most exciting tourist attractions in the province. This allows villagers to generate income through the sale of other crafts..

Agriculture

To make scrap collection safer, they collaborate with expert demining organizations that also provide risk education to the local population.
Laos is one of the poorest countries in SE Asia, 80% of the population relies on subsistence agriculture. After clearing from UXO bombs the lands, the farmers can grow foods again.
Bringing another meaning to farm to table, families eat most of what they harvest, leaving little left to sell. 

Village development

Benefits from the sale of the collection are shared across the community through donations to the Village Development Fund supported by Helvetas.
A micro-credit fund provides small business and other loans to members as well as supports community infrastructure projects. ARTICLE 22 donates to the Village Development Fund 10% on top of product orders to benefit the entire community, from electricity in communal areas to micro-financing livestock investments.

AWARDS

ARTICLE 22 TEAM

Elizabeth Suda

After two years in the Merchandising Department at Coach, she packed her bags and traveled to Laos. Upon arrival in Vientiane she began knocking on the doors of local women-based textile businesses. She was on a mission to understand how local, sustainable crafts made by women could be plugged into the global fashion market.Having studied History at Williams College and Oxford University, she was beguiled by her lack of awareness of the Secret War in Laos 1963-1974 which left a legacy of 80 million unexploded bombs. She created the Peacebomb bracelet with the idea of buying back the bombs.

Camille Hautefort

Hailing from Paris, Camille moved to New York in 2006 at the age of 21 to start a career in international finance and investment banking. Her passion for travelling, design and photography finally brought her to dedicate her time to ARTICLE22 in 2012 after she met Elizabeth and became engaged with the peacebomb story. With a strong international background from her studies spent between France and Spain, and work experience in South America including Brazil, Camille is mainly in charge of developing the business in the US and internationally.

Manivone Sorabmixay 

Also known as “the mayor”, Manivone joined ARTICLE22 in 2013 to support and build the local supply chain. Friendship grew into a working relationship because of Manivone’s passion for serving her community. Prior, she worked with an Italian non- profit, focusing on maternal health: the Women’s Maternity Waiting Home Center and Weaving Group. Her role also included organizing skills training for women around weaving and other crafts.

Beatrice Ost

“In your body is a good place to be”. a mantra for the ageless and wise. Artist and fashion muse, Beatrix brings design talent and vision to her ongoing collaboration with ARTICLE22. With a shared ethos and transformation story of negative to positive, Beatrix was inspired to become a partner. Her personal transformation story was skin cancer that left a Z-shaped scar on her forehead. Embracing this personal horror, she turned it into beauty by tattooing it light purple.

LAOS

One of the poorest nations according to the World Bank, Laos also has the unfortunate distinction of being the most heavily bombed country in history per capita.

Between 1964 and 1973, against the backdrop of the Vietnam War, the Secret War was waged in neutral Laos. To contain the spread of communism, American B-52s dropped an average of one bomb-load every eight minutes, 24 hours a day, for nine years.

80 million of the 250 million bombs dropped failed to detonate, leaving a deadly legacy that plagues the agrarian population today. 
And yet, Laos should not be defined by this war torn past. Like a treasure chest, the country has incredible biological diversity, 47 ethnic groups, and a living craft culture of weaving and natural dyeing.

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